[rearranging]

   when our second floor was complete, we had a bed in our front room. upon finally finishing the third floor, andrew and i stood looking at the newly painted dark walls and both said 'we have to move our bedroom up here.' as andrew puts it, we then moved literally every piece of furniture we own - up and down some very narrow steps, through the front door, around back, etc. the end result is a coat closet where our dressing room was, and a bedroom where our office was intended to be. it was worth it.

 

when our second floor was complete, we had a bed in our front room. upon finally finishing the third floor, andrew and i stood looking at the newly painted dark walls and both said 'we have to move our bedroom up here.' as andrew puts it, we then moved literally every piece of furniture we own - up and down some very narrow steps, through the front door, around back, etc. the end result is a coat closet where our dressing room was, and a bedroom where our office was intended to be. it was worth it.

   dressing room turned coat closet - shown here is  the market bag from moop   see more images from our shoot with moop  here

 

dressing room turned coat closet - shown here is the market bag from moop

see more images from our shoot with moop here

as andrew and i renovated our space and furnished our space, one of our desires was flexibility in arrangement. we wanted the ability to have a room look a certain way for a certain purpose; and once that purpose was fulfilled, the ability to change the room back, or make it look a different way.

so much of this process has been informed by our experience as photographer and artist. very early on in my years at chatham, i interned at the mattress factory, and later worked as an educator there. this led me to experiment with and investigate installation art. my career as a student culminated with a thesis involving three different installation pieces. andrew's work as a photographer has him constantly changing sets, creating lighting scenarios, viewing a blank wall as backdrop to multiple photo-concepts.

in her book everyday aesthetics, yuriko saito says,

'our acknowledgment that a work of art was made by an artist leads to another difference between our experience of art and non-art. with respect to non-art, we literally engage ourselves by handling, changing, modifying, or working on many of them. of course, moral and legal restrictions prevent me from trimming tree branches in my neighbor's yard, spray-painting saints' names on the church wall, or planting exotic flowers in the middle of a national park, no mater how aesthetically motivated these actions may be. however, within these parameters, often guided by aesthetic concerns and interests, we engage with objects around us by cleaning, organizing, mending, rearranging, relocating, and eating on a daily basis.' 

our home is the convergence of creative practice // art making and our everyday. we enjoy the space as home but we also view the space as manipulatable, organic. we recently had moop shop in our home for a photo shoot. this was very exciting. this gave us a taste of using our space in the context of a particular person and brand. as our space evolves, we will continue to rearrange and invite others in. 

*an update since first writing this post: work on our first floor has officially begun! andrew and i are so excited to develop our studio space and begin to invite others to use that space. be sure to follow along as we post images to instagram...a few preliminary photos are already up @heredwelling and @andrewbuda